Burley in Wharfedale village history

Burler and Mender

Working at Greenholme Mills and taking advantage of the natural daylight.

Burler and Mender
Burley Local History Group

Located in the library on Grange Road, and open:

  • Fridays 2:30 - 4:30pm

Burley Local History Group


Characters


Job Senior – The Rombalds Moor Hermit

b 1780 d 1857


The old sign over the entrance to the Hermit Inn at Woodhead carries a picture of the eccentric Job Senior. Both Bogg and Speight in their books about Wharfedale written a century ago mention him. In his early days he had been a labourer, willing to do any job in Wharfedale. He eventually made his home in a rough dwelling on Burley moor and came to be known as the Hermit. A map of 1850 shows what is probably his “hut” on a triangular plot of land near the Coldstone Beck, on the sharp right bend of the Moor road above Robin Hole. It was a dilapidated dwelling. Speight quotes an eye–witness account of Job Senior‘s antics in “his primitive domicile”:

Here he used to hold high court, but the grand levee used to take place on Sundays, when numbers of persons from Bradford and Leeds used to assemble in front of his hut. There he gave them what he termed his “Blast”, which was a composition of his own, to represent sweet melody. The designing old man .. found that his loud chant brought him a large store of coppers as he lay singing on his bed of dried brackens and heather. When he made his ablutions I never heard, but there was plenty of pure water in Coldstone Beck. He had great compass of voice and his lowest notes were most powerful... . Going shooting on the moors at the break of day, we have stopped to listen to old Job, who then had no audience but was generally singing the 100th Psalm, and it was beautifully sung, his loud voice echoing amongst the rocks above, and sounding down far down in the valley

Speight concludes that he died in 1857 aged 77, and was buried in Burley churchyard. The funeral was witnessed by a large crowd. “Such like eccentrics are now of the past, and are not likely to be seen again.”